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FAQs

What is The Hundred Club of Connecticut?

How many families has it helped?

What are the "after care" programs?

Where does the Club get its funds?

Who administers Club programs?

How many are on the staff?

Who specifically is eligible for Club benefits?

Are the funds paid to these families loans or outright gifts?

Is the Hundred Club of Connecticut a unique organization?

How did The Hundred Club movement get started?

Do Hundred Club members receive any benefits?

How are members kept informed?

What do members of the fire, police and correctional services think of the Hundred Club?

Q: What is The Hundred Club of Connecticut?
A: It is a charitable, nonprofit organization chartered in 1967 for the specific purpose of assisting the families of police officers, firefighters, and correction officers who lose their lives in the line of duty.

Q: How many families has it helped?
A: During its 47 years of existence, the Club has aided the families of 98 police officers, 133 firefighters and 7 correction officers who made the supreme sacrifice. Gifts totaling over $9,400,000 have been made to these families.

Q: What are the "after care" programs?
A: The Club, through its staff and Directors, maintains a quiet assessment of family needs and, when necessary, provides help in meeting unexpected expenses and pressing obligations that can overwhelm the family. Arrangements may also be made for medical, dental and other professional services that may be required.

A continuing tradition of the Club is to provide the surviving spouse and children with extra money during the holiday season to make it a joyful time of year. Last Christmas, more than $100,000 was distributed to the families.

As summarized below, the Club offers a variety of programs for the families, but takes special pride in those benefits that enhance the education, development and happiness of the children.

The Fixed Indebtedness Program: In addition to the immediate death benefit of $10,000, there is a Fixed Indebtedness Assistance Review. Under this new program, the Special Assistance Committee will review the fixed indebtedness of new families and has the authority, where appropriate, to recommend to the Board of Directors additional financial relief for individual families concerning large mortgage or other debt service payments. This supplements the regular Special Assistance programs in cases of unusual need.

The Anthony Ustjanauskas Memorial College Scholarship Program: Each college student is eligible for up to $25,000 yearly for tuition and other educational expenses.

The Summer Camp Fund: Under this program, four weeks of camp are provided for every child between the ages of 5 and 16 who cares to take advantage of this opportunity.

The Birthday $100  Savings Program: Every child, through the age of 18, receives $100 each year on his or her birthday and is encouraged to purchase a $200 U.S.Savings Bond.

A Holiday Remembrance four times a year: at Thanksgiving, a turkey; at Christmas, a check for $750.00 to each surviving spouse and $250.00 for each child under 19 years of age; and boxes of candy on Valentine's Day and Mother's Day.

Q: Where does the Club get its funds?
A: From the dues of its generous members who pay $250 annually for the privilege of being a part of The Hundred Club's humanitarian cause.

Q: Who administers Club programs?
A: Policy is established by Club Officers and its Board of Directors who meet quarterly to transact business. Committees meet more frequently as needed and policies are carried out by the Club's staff.

Q: How many are on the staff?
A: The Club employs a Managing Director, an Office Accounting staff person and an Office Manager at its headquarters located at 119 Oakwood Drive, Glastonbury, Connecticut 06033. Elected Officers and Directors perform their functions without compensation.

Q: Who specifically is eligible for Club benefits?
A: The surviving spouse and children of any police officer, firefighter or correction officer who dies in the line of duty. Currently there are more than 50,000 men and women in these uniformed services in Connecticut.

Q: Are the funds paid to these families loans or outright gifts?
A: The payments are grants to eligible families with no conditions attached.

Q: Is the Hundred Club of Connecticut a unique organization?
A: It is the most unique and prestigious organization of its kind in the nation. There are other Hundred Clubs throughout the country, but most of them cover a city, county or a combination of both. Connecticut's Club reaches to every corner of the state, assisting families of all firefighters (paid and volunteer); police officers (state, city, town and borough); and correction officers.

Our organization's benefits are so diversified and all encompassing that our charity has become a model for others to emulate.

Leaders from all parts of the country have approached The Hundred Club of Connecticut for guidance in forming similar organizations.

Q: How did The Hundred Club movement get started?
A: It was conceived by a Detroit businessman who was inspired to organize the first club in 1952 in his city after getting a generous response from 100 friends he asked to contribute to the family of a young Detroit police officer who was fatally shot while attempting to thwart a bank robbery.

Q: Do Hundred Club members receive any benefits?
A: They do not receive nor expect benefits. They ask nothing in return except the satisfaction from serving the surviving spouse and children of fallen heroes.

Q: How are members kept informed?
A: The Club maintains a website and publishes a newsletter, The Hundred Call, which keeps members aware of all Club activities.

Q: What do members of the fire, police and correctional services think of the Hundred Club?
A: The Club has the unqualified endorsement of law enforcement and firefighting associations in the state. To them it is affectionately known as the "Club with a Heart."

 
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